Here come two stories about a magical question: “How can this go even BETTER than I can imagine?” and why it can make your life much easier, instantly.

First story: The Mystery of the Lost Fishing Poles

Recently, we went on a moms-and-kids camping trip. We stayed in chalets at a trout farm just outside of Johannesburg, and it was truly lovely. Felt like being deep in the countryside: a big clean river to play in and dams to fish in.

We rented fishing poles for the day, but by the evening, two poles had gone missing. We’d paid 50 rand per day, per pole. I estimated the poles probably cost R1000 each, more or less. The next day I went scouting around for them but couldn’t locate them, and among the eight children, there was no real way to figure out who had left the poles behind (and no use blaming them, either, since at this age they can’t even find their shoes sitting right in front of their own feet).

So with heavy legs, I trudged up to the office to find out how much we owed on the lost poles. I didn’t really want to fork out any more cash. And those poles looked expensive. And maybe it wasn’t even my kid who had lost them, anyway. Hmph.

After a few sad steps, I remembered my mantra: “How can this go even BETTER than I can imagine?” I started smiling and repeating my affirmation.

When I entered the office, the guy behind the desk looked friendly. He greeted me and said, “Hope you had a great time, and we hope you come back!” I asked if anyone had complained about our children whooping and hollering, but no! “This is a family place. We want kids to be happy here.”

And about the poles? “Oh, we found your poles last night when we were cleaning up. Tell the kids they should keep track next time, they’re worth 600 each.” And he didn’t even charge me for the half-day over time, either! I was free and square, and I walked out a happy and hopeful person. It had gone MUCH better than I had imagined.

Second story: The Grumpy Librarian Part II

Yesterday as I was walking toward the library, I suddenly had a wave of dread crash over me. What if the grumpy librarian was working today? Sigh. I would just dash in and dash out. But I love the library! I wanted to linger, look, and luxuriate in the land of literacy. Rats. I wish she would just retire.

OH! I have my positive affirmation to say! “How does this go even BETTER than I can imagine? How does this unfold in an even more beautiful way than I can even contemplate?” Thinking these kinds of positive thoughts, I strode toward the library with a new energy.

As I passed through the library’s front door, I saw the two nice librarians working behind the counter. I handed in my old books, and I whispered, “Is the, um, other librarian working today?” The nice one smiled and said, “She’s helping at another branch.”

I got even bolder and asked, “Does she perhaps have one day per week when she doesn’t come in?” (planning ahead for next time!) “No, she comes in every day. Just not today.” So, my luck was amazing!

I strolled leisurely through the stacks and found fairy tales for myself, because I’m really into myths and legends at the moment. And I took my time, feeling the peace and harmony of the library in its natural state of bliss. Ahhh. This went even BETTER than I had imagined.

Why does this magical affirmation, or afformation, work?

First of all, technically it’s an “afformation,” (invented by Noah St. John) which is the question form of a positive statement. Here’s an answer I gave to a Shannon Walbran Psychic School member who asked about the question format:

And why is THIS one, “How can this go even better than I can imagine?” a good and effective afformation?

  • Because God’s imagination is MUCH bigger than our own.
  • I can hope for the best, but I can’t even know what that best might be!
  • The creativity and generosity of God and The Universe are hugely expansive and beyond all of our abilities to conceive.

So let’s let the Divine Intelligence do Its job and not limit It with our human fears!

Just make sure to put it in the present tense: “How DOES this go better…?” rather than, “How WILL this go better?” Present is more effective than future.